Tag: constraints led approach

  • Footwork Patterns for Games

    Defining fencing as the art of time and measure is an age-old trope. In that regard, footwork determines the time and the place of the initial engagement. However, according to the core principles of the ecological approach, footwork cannot be divorced from a tangible goal one tries to achieve and the stimuli to which they…

  • Causing Attraction: Non-Dominant Foot Forward in Longsword Fencing

    In ecological dynamics, the term Attractor or Movement Attractor shows up every now and then. Attractors can be seen as preferred motor pattern solutions in the current activity context. When an action is seen as intuitive or habitual, it might be the attractor at work. Habit and intuition can be nebulous concepts however, so to…

  • Constraining the Squinter to Fix Cutting Issues

    Constraining the Squinter to Fix Cutting Issues

    At Bucks, we go through the Lew Gloss in order on a cycle, which helps inform what we will work on in a particular practice. We recently started the schillhaw (which I will henceforth refer to as “squinter”), and it reminded me of common issues people tend to have with it. One of the most…

  • Direct Attack Drill and Distance

    The Direct Attack drill has been one of my favorite games since we have started doing game-centric classes at Bucks, for several reasons, some of which I have stated in previous articles. However, as I have been thinking about the ideas of specifying and non-specifying information, I think it’s time to revisit this long used…

  • Game Design Process: The RPS Method

    Game Design Process: The RPS Method

    Designing a good training game is not easy or straightforward. But having a method to help guide the process makes it easier.

  • Exploring Differential Learning (Part 1)

    Class at Bucks Historical Longsword follows a fairly regular format, we usually do about one “simple” game and one or two “complex” games (simple game being a game with fewer viable paths to success than a complex game, IE direct attack is simple, sabre march is complex), usually based on a passage from the Lew…

  • CLA Adventures with the Zornhaw

    Over the last week or so, we have been going over the zornhaw at my club, and I wanted to go through some of the process of trying to find a game that encourages people to do it without explicitly telling them to do it. By that I mean I’m trying to avoid things like…

  • The Direct Attack Drill is Special: Self-Scaling Games

    The direct attack drill is a drill that I was first introduced to by Adrien Pommellet, who learned it from a Giovanni Rapisardi video. I later read about it in the book Make the Cut by John Chow, in reference to modern Sabre fencing. Over the last couple of years, we have used this game…

  • Buy-in: Implicit Rules in Games and Drills

    The idea of “buy-in” is something that I think a lot about when designing drills and games, so in this article I’d like to give a clear definition and breakdown of what I mean when I talk about buy-in. I don’t want to create a definition that everyone has to use, but this will be…

  • Introducing Students to Fencing through a Constraints-Led Approach

    When talking about using an environmental approach for coaching, one of the first questions which people bring up is typically aIong the lines of “ok so that sounds like it might work well for more advanced fencers, but how would you handle a newbie? Surely you have to teach them techniques first, right?”. Well, no,…