Tag: coaching

  • Beginning to use Games

    So if you’ve been reading this blog for a while now, or participating in discussions about ecological coaching on venues like Facebook or Discord, you might be curious about how to incorporate some of these approaches into your own coaching. However, if you’re currently running a “traditional” class, you might also be hesitant to radically…

  • Invariants as Diagnostics

    In traditional coaching, each movement is normally considered to have an ideal or platonic form, which represents the optimal way it should be executed. Deviation from this form is then an error to be corrected, or at best a variation in response to a specific context. Obviously the ecological approach entirely rejects this framing, but…

  • Causing Attraction: Non-Dominant Foot Forward in Longsword Fencing

    In ecological dynamics, the term Attractor or Movement Attractor shows up every now and then. Attractors can be seen as preferred motor pattern solutions in the current activity context. When an action is seen as intuitive or habitual, it might be the attractor at work. Habit and intuition can be nebulous concepts however, so to…

  • How I Learned To Stop Trying And Finally Fixed Knee Collapse

    I spent a lot of time trying to fix people’s knee collapse. But the solution ended up being to stop trying to fix it, and just give them more realistic training activities.

  • CLA Class Example – Body Language and Deception

    This is a writeup of a class I ran recently which I think makes a good case study in using the Constraints Led Approach to teaching.

  • CLA is Not Games

    A misconception that I see a lot, especially among people who have a passing familiarity with the term but have not looked at it closely, is that the constraints-led approach (CLA) means learning through games. I’m even willing to take partial responsibility for this; after all, this website is called “Game Design for HEMA,” and…

  • Constraining the Squinter to Fix Cutting Issues

    Constraining the Squinter to Fix Cutting Issues

    At Bucks, we go through the Lew Gloss in order on a cycle, which helps inform what we will work on in a particular practice. We recently started the schillhaw (which I will henceforth refer to as “squinter”), and it reminded me of common issues people tend to have with it. One of the most…

  • The Kendo Kote Dilemma – Why Single Choice Cooperative Drills Don’t Work

    Originally published on Fechtlehre . When I trained kendo, the two main attacks that we drilled were kote (right forearm strike) and men (head strike). The way we practiced our basic strikes with partners was through single choice cooperative drills, IE one side provides a chosen stimulus, and the other must react to the stimulus…

  • Exploring Differential Learning (Part 1)

    Class at Bucks Historical Longsword follows a fairly regular format, we usually do about one “simple” game and one or two “complex” games (simple game being a game with fewer viable paths to success than a complex game, IE direct attack is simple, sabre march is complex), usually based on a passage from the Lew…

  • Cues and Kinematics: Brief analogy of animation and motor skills

    In Computer Animation and Robotics (but we won’t discuss the latter since I honestly don’t know much about it), there are two ways of controlling kinetic and motor actions in actors, usually referred to as Forward and Inverse Kinematics. The purpose of both of them is to get joints/bones in characters to achieve a certain…